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How Is Lung Cancer Diagnosed? You Should Read This

How is Lung Cancer Diagnosed?

How lung cancer is diagnosed distinguished from person to person. You might have a number of tests to investigate your symptoms and support a diagnosis of lung cancer, including:

  • Medical history and Physical examination.
  • Imaging experiments, such as chest X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scan, positron emission tomography (PET), scan magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bone scan or ultrasound.
  • Laboratory tests on blood or tissue.
  • Sputum cytology, where test samples of sputum (mucus coughed up from the lungs) are examined under a microscope.
  • Lung biopsy, where a small sample of tissue or liquid is removed, often with a thin needle, to be examined under a microscope.
  • Thoracentesis, where the fluid is removed with a needle from the space between the lining of the chest and lungs should be examined under the microscope.
  • Mediastinoscopy and Mediastinotomy, where a thin tube with a lens and illumination at the end inserted into the environment between the lungs (through cutting front part of the neck or between two ribs) to look for abnormalities or doing a biopsy.
  • Video-assisted thoracoscopy, where a thin tube with an illumination and a lens on the end is inserted into the chest (through a slouse stimulated between two ribs) to look for abnormalities or to take biopsies.
  • Bronchoscopy, where a thin tube with an illumination and a lens on the end is set through the nose or mouth to look inside the trachea (windpipe) and big airways in the lungs or to take biopsies. Modern bronchoscopy also uses ultrasound (EBUS) to accurately determine cancer.

How Is Lung Cancer Diagnosed

Staging

If you are diagnosed with lung cancer, Read More